Skip to content

Grammarflex

Grammarflex logo

Are Scissors Singular or Plural?

Often called 'a pair of scissors,' scissors are only referred to as a plural, since it's made up of parts.



What’s the plural of “scissors”?

Often called ‘a pair of scissors,’ scissors is exclusively plural, since it’s made up of parts. Scissors has no singular form. Some nouns in English that consist of pairs, parts or pieces are only referred to in the plural case. Words and things like glasses, spectacles, pants, jeans, trousers and tongs are all only used in the plural, and therefore have no singular noun form.

Scissors: singular or plural?

Scissors is a plural noun with no singular noun form. This is because scissors are a tool made up of parts.

What are scissors?

The word and commonly used household object scissors are defined in the dictionary as,  “a cutting instrument having two blades whose cutting edges slide past each other.”

Plural-only nouns

The following are nouns made up of pairs, parts or pieces and are only referred to as a plural:

Plural-only/non-singular nouns.
Plural-only/non-singular nouns. By Gflex on Canva.

Examples of scissors used in context

1. This can be done by coin flip or rock-paper-scissors.

2. She picked up a pair of scissors from the windowsill.

3. He told me to get some scissors.

4. Grab your ribbon, a pair of scissors, and let’s get started. Charlyne Mattox, Country Living, 11 Sep. 2022

5. Hand me those scissors.

Origin of the word scissors

From etymonline on scissors:

“Pair of shears of medium or small size,” late 14c., sisoures, also cisours, sesours, cisurs, etc., from Old French cisoires (plural) “shears,” from Vulgar Latin *cisoria (plural) “cutting instrument,” ultimately from Latin caedere “to cut”.



‍Keep reading!

What’re personal pronouns?

What’s the difference between they’re, their, and there?

Whose vs who’s?

Sources

  1. Definition of scissors.
  2. Synonyms for scissors.
  3. Origin of the word scissors.


Recent Posts

Assent, ascent or accent?

Assent or Ascent (or Accent?)

When to use assent, ascent and accent The differences between assent, ascent and accent: Assent may be a noun or a verb: the former refers

Device or devise?

Devise or Device? (Meaning, Usage)

What’s the difference between device and devise? Devise is a verb meaning “to invent or plan”. Device is a noun that refers to “an object

Paid or payed?

Is “Paid” or “Payed” Correct?

What is the correct past tense of “pay”? The verb pay, which describes giving money to someone for something you want to buy or for

Amiable or amicable?

When to Use Amiable or Amicable?

Are amiable and amicable the same? Both amiable and amicable are describing words (i.e., adjectives); the difference mostly concerns what it is that they describe:

Is it creeped or crept?

What’s the Past Tense of Creep?

Is it creeped or crept? If you’re trying to say that you’re creeped out by something, use creeped. Otherwise, both creeped and crept are accepted